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COMMUNICATION THRU SPELLING

26 letters = infinite ways to communicate!

l

o

H

e

l

Spelling using a letter board or keyboard to communicate is an AAC communication modality that teaches individuals the purposeful motor skills necessary for pointing to letters as an alternative means of communication.

Mosaic Pathways supports all forms of AAC. We specialize in methods of spelling and typing, and provide training for students and families of individuals with motor and sensory differences
(autism, apraxia, dyspraxia, Down syndrome).

Overview of Communication
Using Letterboards / Keyboards 

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COMMUNICATION THRU SPELLING 

Communication using spelling 

teaches individuals the purposeful motor skills necessary to point to letters to spell as an alternative way to communicate.

 

Motor skills progress along an increasingly complex hierarchy from pointing to letters to typing on a keyboard.

Communicaton Regulation Partners use scaffolded supports to teach individuals who are non-speaking or have unreliable verbal abilities to express themselves with alternative communication.

Communication Using
Letterboards & Keyboards  

TERMS TO KNOW

Apraxia:

A neurological condition in which people find it difficult to make certain motor movements, even though their muscles are normal.

Communication Using Letters:

A form of AAC where the individual develops purposeful motor skills to point to letters using a letterboard or keyboard to communicate in unlimited ways.

Presuming Competence:

Believing students want to learn and have the ability to learn. Non-speaking does not mean non-thinking! 

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TRAINING FOR STUDENTS & FAMILIES

  • Parents learn how to be their child's Communication Regulation Partner (CRP)

 

  • Supporting individuals who are non, minimal or unreliably speaking to communicate thru spelling.

  • Age-appropriate academic instruction supports learning, communication, sensory regulation and motor praxis. 

  • Students of all ages first learn the motor skill needed to respond via low-tech AAC (i.e. letterboard) with continual learning and skill development.

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